Recent comments

  • Reply to: Esprit d'Escalier   by   3 years 8 months ago

    Curated to show the origin of this riff.

  • Reply to: Paper Airplane   by   3 years 8 months ago

    A bit of an update. I asked Toby and he confirmed the recipes (although not the bourbon choices), but said that he thought that Sammy originally created it with Campari and then changed it himself to Aperol. It's also not clear when the name changed to AIRplane, and whether it was intentional. Still researching... I have changed the amaro, corrected the instructions, and specified the bourbon.

  • Reply to: #47   by   3 years 8 months ago

    Hey man, water is life! :)

  • Reply to: Coin Toss   by   3 years 8 months ago

    I had my bartender make this for me since I don't have the rum. It came out on the sweet side. Maybe a different rum or less of the other ingredients next time

  • Reply to: Apple Jack Rabbit   by   3 years 8 months ago

    I tried this both as written and with bourbon (because, uh, I goofed). Both are interesting. I also tried the absinthe garnish, but I think it overwhelmed it because I used too much (more of a float). I think if I actually had a dropper bottle, I might have liked it more. It is a very mild-mannered cocktail -- a good choice for someone looking for something relaxing and easy-to-drink. It's also a good introduction to apple brandy.

  • Reply to: Darkside   by   3 years 8 months ago

    It seems extravagant to mix with such an expensive wine, but it is quite sweet; the gin tempers that while still letting all the delicious spice flavors shine through. This recipe is flexible- I thought the wine got a little lost with the stated proportions- I liked it 1:1 with a little extra lime, so adjust to taste.

  • Reply to: #47   by   3 years 8 months ago

    Curated to reflect source link's instructions: built rather than stirred and strained. Minor point, no doubt.

  • Reply to: Apple Jack Rabbit   by   3 years 8 months ago

    I had been adding a dash or two of absinthe to this (PDT) version of the recipe:

    2oz Laird's Bonded Apple Brandy
    3/4oz Lemon Juice
    3/4oz Orange Juice
    1/2oz Grade B Maple Syrup

    http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2011/10/applejack-rabbit-classic-appl...

  • Reply to: The Secret Is in the Telling   by   3 years 8 months ago

    Curated to add instructions for make the Sweet Corn Simple Syrup.

  • Reply to: Apple Jack Rabbit   by   3 years 8 months ago

    BTW, you made it before we corrected the recipe to include orange juice. I still think your absinthe garnish sounds nice. Anise and maple sounds unusual -- in a good way.

  • Reply to: Apple Jack Rabbit   by   3 years 8 months ago

    Curated with poster's permission/approval to include the missing orange juice and some history. This is rather a difficult drink to list because the original is undrinkable by today's standards and there seems to be no consensus about how that should be remedied.

  • Reply to: Apple Jack Rabbit   by   3 years 8 months ago

    Excellent with a few drops of absinthe to garnish.

  • Reply to: Beuser & Angus Special   by   3 years 8 months ago

    Divine nectar.

  • Reply to: Culross   by   3 years 8 months ago

    Curated to reflect authentic historic drink, with modern improvements moved to the notes.

  • Reply to: Tantris Sidecar   by   3 years 8 months ago

    REALLY good. Was tempted to dock half a star due to labor intensity, but couldn't do it. ✯✯✯✯✯

  • Reply to: Broken Shoe Shiner   by   3 years 8 months ago

    That is odd. The recipe came directly from the first edition of Rogue Cocktails -- now renamed Beta Cocktails. The blurb from the first edition is reproduced in this blog post by Fred Yarm on Cocktail Virgin Slut, along with some interesting backstory.

    The only difference I see in the two recipes is that the one from Rogue Cocktails specifies merely "Pernod," but which we assume Stephen means Pernod brand pastis. Rimbaud's Left Hand on about.com specifies "Pernod Absinthe." This is a quite different from the sweet low-alcohol pastis of the Rogue Cocktails recipe. Interestingly, the photograph on the about.com page is copyright Pernod Absinthe.

    I wonder if Pernod modified the recipe when it introduced its Absinthe. This is mere speculation, of course. I will see if I can contact Stephen Cole and find out.

  • Reply to: Broken Shoe Shiner   by   3 years 8 months ago

    This exact recipe is posted on About.com and is called "Rimbaud's Left Hand." Any background on which name is more authentic?

    http://cocktails.about.com/od/cocktailrecipes/r/rimbaudlefthand.htm

  • Reply to: Airmail   by   3 years 8 months ago

    Made with El Dorado 12 year rum, this is one of my favorite drinks of all time. I made this at my brother-in-law's wedding reception, and it was a huge hit.

  • Reply to: Violet Hour   by   3 years 8 months ago

    Curated to provide another instruction, detail on bitters, and another source reference.

  • Reply to: The Grasshopper Lies Heavy   by   3 years 8 months ago

    Really a dessert drink. Too sweet as written for before dinner. I don't know how much 3 dashes of cocoa powder is, so I used 1/2 tsp. The drink has an interesting balance between the herbal, bitter, mint/menthol, and chocolate.

  • Reply to: Twentieth Century Cocktail   by   3 years 8 months ago

    Curated to spell out name and merge into this cocktail the variations of the existing "modern" variation.

  • Reply to: Marais   by   3 years 8 months ago

    Happy Day! Bittermen's Amere Nouvelle is now being distributed. I haven't seen it yet in the Boston area, but DrinkUpNY has it for NYC and mail order (into those states that can). Also, if you click the Amer Picon link in the recipe, you'll find similar information to these comments.

  • Reply to: Berlioni   by   3 years 8 months ago

    The cocktail was updated to reflect the authoritative recipe in the PDT cocktail book. The previous (very similar) recipe was for a smaller less boozy drink: 1:2/3:1/2

  • Reply to: Marais   by   3 years 8 months ago

    Hi Rob,

    Amer Picon is not currently imported into the States and is therefore tough to find. Two good substitutes are Torani Amer and CioCiaro.

  • Reply to: Dirt in my Drink   by   3 years 8 months ago

    Just made it again tonight for the first time in a long time. Those little cans of prune juice have been littering up the refrigerator long enough. I tried it with both 1/2 and 1 full oz of prune juice and was happy with it as written. My wife didn't like it when I made it last time, but came around this time.

    You are right prunes. A favorite ice cream of mine is "dried plum armagnac" from Lizzy's in Waltham, MA. Do you think it would sell as well a "prune brandy ice cream?"

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