Recent comments

  • Reply to: Corpse Reviver #3 (Robert Hess)   by   4 years 5 months ago

    Salt might work, although I tend to think of using it more with savory flavors like Cynar. I would like to re-try this with Pierre Ferrand Dry Curacao in lieu of triple sec. I think the brandy base and the modest sugar would both help.

  • Reply to: Brooklyn Cocktail   by   4 years 5 months ago

    Is this really supposed to be equal amounts of rye and dry vermouth? I like this drink with more of a 3:1 ratio

  • Reply to: Liberal   by   4 years 5 months ago

    Been meaning to try this for probably a yr- finally did, and not a fan as it is too sweet and the orange flavor is overwhelming. I did use Bittermens Amere Nouvelle so I'm not sure how much of a difference that makes. I'd much prefer a Brooklyn cocktail.

  • Reply to: Corpse Reviver #3 (Robert Hess)   by   4 years 5 months ago

    Salt can also cut bitterness. Would a tiny pinch of salt bring out the floweriness of the citrus?

  • Reply to: Crazed Fruit   by   4 years 5 months ago

    This is one of the few drinks I've made up that I go back to on a regular basis - basically whenever I have a bottle of bianco open. I'll have to try it with dry vermouth - actually, dry vermouth and rhum agricole makes a lot of sense to me, although that's a dry starting point for any cocktail.

  • Reply to: Prospect Park   by   4 years 5 months ago

    Hmm... I'm imagining a bar where you have to spell your drink in order to get served. As much as I abhor mangled English, I do not go there often. ;)

  • Reply to: Crazed Fruit   by   4 years 5 months ago

    Still no bianco, so I made this with dry vermout h. Very nice and not, to my taste, too dry. I'm not sure about the persimmon, but it's a fruity drink with no strong fruit ingredient.

  • Reply to: Prospect Park   by   4 years 5 months ago

    If you can't spell Nonino, you aren't allowed to drink it. Go directly to Jägermeister; do not pass Go.

  • Reply to: Fig Bee's Knees   by   4 years 5 months ago

    Sounds very good, and a reason to finally get some Fee Black Walnut Bitters. Republished as a Fig Bee's Knees, since it is not a Martini-style cocktail. The original poster is welcome to rename it so long as the name conforms to any well-established drinks referenced in the name.

  • Reply to: Single Serving Egg Nog   by   4 years 5 months ago

    Moderated slightly for style and to consolidate ginger snap liqueur into ginger liqueur. I presumed that the pinch of nutmeg was the garnish, and was not in the shaker.

  • Reply to: Prospect Park   by   4 years 5 months ago

    Dan,

    I'll let you slide halfway... now if you ran out of Nonnino ;)

  • Reply to: Prospect Park   by   4 years 5 months ago

    I just went to try this tonight and -- THE HUMANITY -- out of Punt e Mes. How I could let this happen, I do not know. Zach is going to strip me of my rank in the Federation of Amari Sluts.

  • Reply to: Philabuster   by   4 years 5 months ago

    Very good. Maybe a touch sweet for my taste. I was tempted to try a touch of Lactart in it. Do you really mean to serve this in a highball? The glass will be about 2/3 empty. (Cocktail moderated slightly for style.)

  • Reply to: Prospect Park   by   4 years 5 months ago

    Wow, was this really not on here before? A Boston classic!

  • Reply to: Mizz Mazza   by   4 years 5 months ago

    M'K, the cocktails namesake has ruled in favor of the lemon version. You win again, Chadwick! I'm going to update the recipe accordingly. We'll take joint custody.

  • Reply to: Streets of Gettysburg   by   4 years 5 months ago

    My coffee liqueur is from House Spirits, and I used a lemon twist since that is what I had. I like how the sherry comes through, and it pairs really well with the coffee and spicy herbal flavors from the other ingredients.

  • Reply to: Valkyrie   by   4 years 5 months ago

    Delightful. Almost dessert-y in its decadence.

  • Reply to: Simmer and Smoke   by   4 years 5 months ago

    To clean up the line breaks, moved the instructions for the simple to the notes section. Added some capitalization to the name.

  • Reply to: Ward Eight   by   4 years 5 months ago

    PDT substitutes 1 bsp pomegranate molasses plus 1/4 oz simple syrup for the grenadine. Tart and a bit darker than the original.

  • Reply to: Mizz Mazza   by   4 years 5 months ago

    I just did a side-by-side and still like them both a lot, though I might like the lemon version a bit more. My wife, a Campari purist, prefers the vermouth version. I mixed both of these as up cocktails. I'm going to try to get the cocktail's namesake to try the lemon version and see what she thinks.

  • Reply to: Apples and Oranges   by   4 years 5 months ago

    very well balanced

  • Reply to: Battle Of Algiers   by   4 years 5 months ago

    Chai infusion instructions?

  • Reply to: Army Of Shadows   by   4 years 5 months ago

    I like your naming style.

  • Reply to: The Deliverance   by   4 years 5 months ago

    Sorry Zachary, I haven't checked back in a bit.
    The Infusion is very quick and simple. Per 750ml bottle of Bourbon (I use Bulleit at home, and Four Roses at work, both work well) add a SMALL fistful of food grade cedar chips. Any store that sells barbeque chips should have cedar (about $5 for a big bag). Throw it all in a mason jar for 3-4 hours, agitating occasionally, and then strain it back into the bottle. The more chips you use the shorter the infusion time, but you're going to lose a lot more bourbon to the chips. You should lose about an ounce per bottle. And don't let it sit for more than four hours, cause it can get extremely bitter.
    You can just toss the chips out after, or throw them in a batch of rich simple and simmer it for 15min. Then your left with an intense cedar syrup, which I've been using a lot.
    Cheers!

  • Reply to: Murray Stenson needs our help   by   4 years 5 months ago

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