Recent comments

  • Reply to: Ramos Gin Fizz   by   3 years 7 months ago

    Has anyone ever had a ramos with Ransom? Seems like it would be pretty strange...

  • Reply to: SloeFood   by   3 years 7 months ago

    Curated slightly - Punt e Mes is sweet vermouth.

  • Reply to: Autumn Manhattan   by   3 years 7 months ago

    I like this, actually I find it almost too sweet. For me I'd use a spicier rosso like Vya or a sherry-like one like Vermut Lacuenta and dial it up to a full ounce. Heering good here, though Combier Rouge would lend a fresher cherry note. Rye and calvados play well together!

  • Reply to: Ramos Gin Fizz   by   3 years 7 months ago

    Curated slightly: Changed gin from gin (old tom or plymouth) to Old Tom Gin. Added history, creator, and date.

  • Reply to: Pimms No.1 Cup   by   3 years 7 months ago

    A nice variation is adding 1/2 oz Limoncello, 2 oz Ginger Ale and use 1 1/4 oz of 7 Up.

  • Reply to: Berlioni   by   3 years 7 months ago

    I love this drink. It's unexpectedly floral, but in a very appetizing way. A great drink for the advanced negroni connoisseur.

  • Reply to: Bitter Mai Tai   by   3 years 7 months ago

    Interesting drink! I thought it would be too sweet given the ratio of sweet to sour, but the bitterness balances everything out nicely. Fairly bitter, but also super-smooth. I'm a fan.

  • Reply to: Twisted Tonic   by   3 years 7 months ago

    Curated slightly - changed Cinchona Bark to Cinchona bark tincture.

  • Reply to: Adonis Cocktail (Dale Degroff Variation)   by   3 years 7 months ago

    Curated quite a bit. So... this is Degroff's adaptation of the 19th century Adonis cocktail. As you can see, the adaptation is wildlyy different from the original. Degroff specifically calls for 1 oz Vya dry and 1/2 oz generic dry vermouth, and a flamed orange peel. His version is shaken, where the original is stirred. Updated notes to show original version, history, and provided a link to the Degroff book on Amazon to show the cocktail. 

    Thanks,

    Zachary

  • Reply to: Indochine   by   3 years 7 months ago

    Curated slightly - changed Basil, Thai to Thai Basil as an ingredient. Due to how things that need articles are generated, "Thai" was on my list of things, which is a bit difficult.

  • Reply to: The Beauty Beneath   by   3 years 7 months ago

    I finally opened my Vergano Americano so I could make this. Sadly, all I taste is rum and cointreau, which is a shame because the Chinato itself is delicious. Much wiser to make the Campari Swizzle (thank you Dan!), or just mix it with some gin and maybe a bit of lime.

  • Reply to: Heering Flip   by   3 years 7 months ago

    So why not try something from Beta Cocktails - it's seasonally appropriate, I adore the bitters, and the raw egg's just a bonus. Made with Luxardo's Sangue Morlacco (it was either that or Maurin Quina, and I didn't want to pile on the bitterness).

    So, on the obvious side, the bitters drive the drink. and the cherry is a nice counterweight and again, an obvious pair for the chocolatey bitters. Weirdly enough, it's a bit on the simple side, but well thought out. I think round 2 with this will be adding 1/4 oz of Lemon Hart 151 and a Luxardo cherry or 2 garnish (to reinforce the cherry flavor between sips).

    Thanks,

    Zachary

  • Reply to: Prizefighter   by   3 years 7 months ago

    Dan,

    The muddled lemon ought to give the 1/4 oz lemon juice a bit of lift, I'd think.

    Zachary

  • Reply to: The French Connection   by   3 years 7 months ago

    Sandy, I've heard of that, but don't have access to it. I really want to try the Ted Breaux "Perique", which again.... heard of, don't know if it exists. 

    The article about tobacco references that AoD article, which is a great summation of the what people know about tobacco infusions. 

    Thanks,

    Zachary

  • Reply to: Cul de Sac   by   3 years 7 months ago

    Well, I'm from Canada. But like I said, give it a try with St. Germaine and cut the Fernet to taste. I first made it with St. Germaine. I liked it better with Chase and it's cheaper, that's all.

  • Reply to: Prizefighter   by   3 years 7 months ago

    Give it a try. I love Fernet Branca and this was one of my favorite drinks on my last visit to Dram.

  • Reply to: The French Connection   by   3 years 7 months ago

    You're absolutely right, zach. You need proper guidance when experimenting with tobacco infusions. Snake oil makes a great tobacco bitters that is approved as food grade. Also extracting the flavor by actually distilling your own spirit is safe. Here is a great article I read that you might appreciate:

    http://www.artofdrink.com/blog/nicotini-tobacco-infusions/

  • Reply to: Bask   by   3 years 7 months ago

    Thank you very much. I have to admit that it was inspired by the even better Shiver. The Shiver, however, required Clear Creek Eau de Vie of Douglas Fir, which is both hard to find and quite expensive (about $50/375ml, or $133/liter). Bask is easy to make and Kirschwasser is readily available and more likely to be in one's liquor cabinet that just about any other equ de vie, I think. It is full of bright sunshine.

  • Reply to: Artist's Special Cocktail   by   3 years 7 months ago

    Curated - reverted recipe to original Savoy ingredients (including vagueness on the part of the Sherry, and Groseille syrup instead of Creme de Cassis). Improved attribution as per the Savoy book.

  • Reply to: Don's Little Bitter   by   3 years 7 months ago

    Made this tonight for Repeal Day, and I'm wondering where it's been all my life. I subbed St. James Hors d'Age for the Barbancourt. Weirdly enough, the Ango Orange drives this cocktail - it's got a strong bitter orange peel/vitamin aroma and flavor, but considering all the bitter in this, it is only mildly so. This is really delicious stuff. 

    Thanks,

    Zachary

  • Reply to: Bask   by   3 years 7 months ago

    Real good, Dan.

  • Reply to: Old Fashioned (Late 20th Century)   by   3 years 7 months ago

    Curated name from "Perfect Old Fashioned" because of the well-established conflicting meaning of the word Perfect in cocktail titles. This recipe is similar to how Old Fashioned were made in my youth. I also reordered the ingredient to help them be consistent with the Kindred Cocktails style.

  • Reply to: Manhattan (Bénédictine)   by   3 years 7 months ago

    Renamed from "Perfect Manhattan" because the word "perfect" has a long-standing tradition of meaning using a 50:50 mixture of sweet and dry vermouth in lieu of all one or the other.

  • Reply to: The Warning Label   by   3 years 7 months ago

    Curated slightly to reflect the Beta Cocktails recipe, which calls for "1 oz Demerara 151 rum".

  • Reply to: Mojito   by   3 years 7 months ago

    Try adding 1 oz of Mango Puree and a splash of Ginger Liqueur or muddle with a little fresh ginger for a delicious twist.

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