Recent comments

  • Reply to: Bitter Blossom   by   4 years 1 month ago

    Yup, work is how I make 90% of all the drinks I want to try or create, though my home bar has become pretty respectable over the years. It's far easier to do it that way, and you can transfer the costs to R&D if your accounting is set up that way. Dante's Requiem is definitely more adventurous of a cocktail. I love Yellow Chartruese but green is a bit more touchy, like when using absinthe and Branca....well, you have to like Branca, even a couple dashes is potent for most. ( I've found that a couple dashes is about an 1/8 tsp or so). as for Benedictine, it's well worth the cost for home, it's just wonderful stuff. We use it in or Manhattan here. By the way, way more fun than cooking, David, ha! Cheers!

  • Reply to: Creep   by   4 years 2 months ago

    Thanks for pointing out the lack of directions. I fixed that. Tremontis is the brand of mirto that I can get here in Boston.

  • Reply to: Red Eyen   by   4 years 2 months ago

    the lactart is TONS of fun to play with, i am so glad you got it! i cant tell you how amused i was at first tasting the stuff..... i kept turning it over and over in my mind.... flavorless acidity... the possibilities! thank you again and again for your articles... honestly they were the direct inspiration for the drink i made with that substance. try it on a nice anejo margerita and watch how beautifully the flavor of the tequilla comes out without the lime. a half dash at a time and taste taste taste as you add. its so exciting to me watching flavors meld apart and back together when making drinks. its so much more fun than cooking! cheers!

  • Reply to: Bitter Blossom   by   4 years 2 months ago

    very nice, indeed, i am a big fan of the add more rye tweak, made it for my gf later that night and cut back the carpano for her taste.... benedictine, brilliant. ironically or not, i actually had benedictine on my list of things to buy next, literally.. next. i really appreciate the feedback.i was actually eyeballing "dante's requiem" a few nights ago..... that is actually one i would rather try at work.. i know a few people that would appreciate it... i will absolutely let you know. thanks again.

  • Reply to: Eastern Exposure   by   4 years 2 months ago

    Used Canton (because that's what I had) and Bulleit Rye (because I'm, well, me and will almost always go rye over bourbon). Very tasty cocktail, and perfect for, well, a night like tonight.

  • Reply to: Creep   by   4 years 2 months ago

    This sounds interesting. Have not seen Mirto over here so might take some online investigation. Also no directions but I'm assuming shaken over rocks given the amounts, correct?

  • Reply to: The Bitter Philadelphian   by   4 years 2 months ago

    Curated this slightly. In a 9 oz glass full of ice, you're liable to get 5-6 oz of Chinotto in the glass. We try to be precise with volumes, avoiding "top with" as an instruction, as glass size varies pretty wildly.

    Thanks,

    Zachary

  • Reply to: The Fogcutter   by   4 years 2 months ago

    Cleaned this up a lot. It now conforms to the original recipe quoted in Beachbum Berry Remixed. Kaiser Penguin has a good comparison of the various Fogcutter recipes floating around the Internet, but basically says that the orange juice is the dangerous part of this drink and the goal is to get it into balance with everything else. Some of the many variations are noted in the Notes section.

  • Reply to: Lipspin   by   4 years 2 months ago

    Plymouth and TBT are the good ones, with TBT being more bitter. Like most things, cheap sloe gin is bad sloe gin - they're usually flavored instead of infused, and full of sugar.

    Thanks,

    Zachary

  • Reply to: Lipspin   by   4 years 2 months ago

    I haven't tried it, but The Bitter Truth also makes a good one -- reportedly a bit more bitter than Plymouth. I'm not familiar with any others that are worth drinking. The Plymouth sloe gin is a challenging flavor -- definitely not like cherry cough syrup.

  • Reply to: Lipspin   by   4 years 2 months ago

    OK, you got me. Not Plymouth. I'll have to give it a try with that, too.

  • Reply to: Lipspin   by   4 years 2 months ago

    What sloe gin are you using? I find the Plymouth pretty far from cough syrup.

  • Reply to: Bitter Union   by   4 years 2 months ago

    Thanks so much, Christina! I consider the Hemingway Daiquiri (Papa Doble) one of the very best drinks ever devised, so the comparison means a great deal to me.

  • Reply to: Lipspin   by   4 years 2 months ago

    I feel like it needs a little spice to cut the cough-syrupiness of the sloe gin, like if you cut the amount of Cynar by half and add the same amount of Punt e Mes. Will try that.

  • Reply to: Cherry Blossom   by   4 years 2 months ago

    I found my source reference and added it. You can read the comparison between Luxardo and Stock. I've never tried Stock, so I can't comment, but using a bit less of both Lemon and Luxardo might be a good idea. I did raise an eyebrow at a full ounce of Maraschino! I plan to try this myself soon. With that much lemon, I think it might be best shaken.

  • Reply to: Cherry Blossom   by   4 years 2 months ago

    Sweet-tart flavored. We used Luxardo and Bulldog Gin. Stirred, not shaken (sorry, Mr. Bond!). A nice drink with a pretty pinkish-red hue. It definitely looks like the cherry blossoms that will pop out soon here in the Washington, DC, area.

  • Reply to: Craft Cocktail Making: Theory and Structure of Alcohol   by   4 years 2 months ago
  • Reply to: Felix Swizzle   by   4 years 2 months ago

    Delicious. Perfect balance of sweet and strong, and the absinthe just adds more character and depth. Tried this a bit ago just after wrapping up MxMo Tiki Theme. 5 stars.

  • Reply to: Bitter Blossom   by   4 years 2 months ago

    It's nice, David. Carpano is definitely richer and more sophisticated than other vermouths. I made another tweak after trying this by upping the rye to 1 1/2oz, adding 1 1/2tsp of Benedictine. I like more of that spice and herbs that you get from the rye and herbal liqueurs, as the Antica can overtake easily with an equal portions. I love St. Germain, its great stuff and works well in so many different applications. Maybe an ovenproof rye like Rittenhouse would be nice as well. 4 stars.

  • Reply to: Poire liquide Hélène   by   4 years 2 months ago

    I use an unaged one (at least not barrel aged). Depending on the Poire Williams, you need quite a lot of syrup. Using an aged one might be interesting to get some of the vanilla flavors from another source. I like the way the unaged version looks like a clear spirit on ice, though

    Are Mozart Chocolate Bitters not available in the U.S.? They've become sort of a standard for Chocolate Bitters here in Germany, although I often find them too intense which makes them difficult to use.
    I'll try to experiment with some other chocolate bitters to see what they can do.

    I always use the twist to get some of the oils on the drink's surface. Most recipes for Poire belle Hélène that I've seen so far call for a little lemon and I think it works very well with the vanilla. I also put the twist in the glass as garnish whenever I don't have any candied violets at hand.

    Cheers,

    Anton

  • Reply to: Craft Cocktail Making: Theory and Structure of Alcohol   by   4 years 2 months ago
  • Reply to: Craft Cocktail Making: Theory and Structure of Alcohol   by   4 years 2 months ago
  • Reply to: Poire liquide Hélène   by   4 years 2 months ago

    Do you prefer aged or unaged Poire Williams in this drink? I wish I could find the Mozart Dry where I am, as this sounds rather interesting. Oh, and the twist in the drink as the garnish, correct?

    Thanks,

    Zachary

  • Reply to: Summer Rye   by   4 years 2 months ago

    Corrected to cider, improved attribution, added garnish, streamlined instructions.

  • Reply to: Bitter Union   by   4 years 2 months ago

    I had an orange to juice after stealing all the peel for garnishes, so I tried this... I really like this drink. It reminds me of a Hemingway Daiquiri, but richer and more interesting yet still light and refreshing Thanks.

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