Recent comments

  • Reply to: Rum Row Old Fashioned   by   4 years 2 months ago

    Fixed this. Changed Anejo rum, Angostura to orange bitters, Angostura to match cited article. Rewrote instructions to avoid copyright infringement.

  • Reply to: Rum Row Old Fashioned   by   4 years 2 months ago

    It says to drop "orange and burlesque bitters" on sugar. Is the dash of anejo rum supposed to be Angostura orange bitters?

  • Reply to: The Gringo   by   4 years 2 months ago

    Updated this to reflect the cited article - added 1/2 oz Dolin Blanc.

  • Reply to: Aunt Emily   by   4 years 2 months ago

    Finally got around to trying this and followed Charles H. Baker's admonition to use DRY apricot brandy as opposed to something like Brizard Apry. I used the Blume Marillen, Laird's Bonded Apple Brandy, Beefeater and my own grenadine. The drink is actually delicious (not a given with Charles H.) and very dry with an elusive taste. As you sip, the apple just begins to intrude and then is gently but firmly pushed aside by the botanicals of he gin while the orange hovers around providing a bass line. It's a good drink!

    Keith

  • Reply to: Pineau Martini   by   4 years 2 months ago

    Happy to share :)

  • Reply to: Pineau Martini   by   4 years 2 months ago

    Why have I not thought of this? I've loved Pineau des Charentes for decades, and it would seem a natural with gin and a barspoon of something. Simple and tasty means an ideal cocktail to me. Thanks Christina, and Rachel!

  • Reply to: Work In Progress   by   4 years 2 months ago

    Fixed. Thanks for the catch.

  • Reply to: Work In Progress   by   4 years 2 months ago

    Note that the original recipe also calls for 3 dashes of orange bitters.

  • Reply to: Pineau Martini   by   4 years 2 months ago

    You can vary ratio of Pineau to gin to taste. My favorite bartender makes me variations of this; he has used Nolet's, Oola, and Botanist gin, and often finishes the drink with an orange twist and a barspoon of something interesting- he has used Benedictine, Luxardo Maraschino, and Cocchi Americano, all to good effect. Sweeter than a traditional martini, but the gin flavors still shine through.

  • Reply to: The Ice Pick   by   4 years 2 months ago

    This is great. I love a traditional aviation, but it can get too lemony and too sweet- this is a more nuanced cocktail, and a good variation to have in the rotation, thanks.

  • Reply to: Blinker   by   4 years 2 months ago

    I suspect that grapefruit juice in 1930 was quite a bit more tart than today. The sugar probably needs to be adjusted down, and certainly would be if using sweet grapefruits like ruby or pink. Tart white grapefruit would be more authentic, I think.

  • Reply to: Blinker   by   4 years 2 months ago

    I do like the PDT version, but if no preserves I use the original recipe and up the raspberry syrup to 1/2 oz. I enjoy this more than the Brown Derby which I felt was lacking something....

  • Reply to: Orchard Sour   by   4 years 2 months ago

    Another good model drink. I used Becherovka in place of cinnamon syrup. The apricot liqueur can be replaced by almost any fruity or herbal liqueur- tonight I tried Licor 43, thinking of Dan's Czechers in Paradise.

  • Reply to: Industry Sour   by   4 years 2 months ago

    Discovered this tonight when I saw your comment and had to try it immediately. It didn't disappoint. The fernet and Chartreuse are an herbal marriage made in heaven. 5/5.

  • Reply to: Industry Sour   by   4 years 2 months ago

    The greatest thing known to man

  • Reply to: Un Café Va Bene   by   4 years 2 months ago

    This is the most satisfying espresso drink I've ever had, and that includes mochas (my daily staple). It tastes like I'm drinking espresso with cream, sugar, chocolate, and chicory. I'm getting tobacco, too. It's ridiculous! 5/5.

  • Reply to: Blinker   by   4 years 2 months ago

    I like to make this following PDT's variation of 1/4 oz simple syrup with a barspoon of raspberry preserve instead of raspberry syrup.

  • Reply to: Rose   by   4 years 2 months ago

    This is another cocktail that I appreciate as a model, and it is another good way to utilize a bottle of dry vermouth. I have a ton of Creme Yvette to use up (wouldn't purchase again, fyi)- it works well in place of raspberry syrup. I've also used Clear Creek Slivovitz in place of Kirschwasser to good effect. Pineau des Charentes in place of dry vermouth makes a sweeter but equally pleasing cocktail. Pear eau de vie with a barspoon of pear liqueur in place of the raspberry works too...

  • Reply to: Spanish Sigh   by   4 years 2 months ago

    I tried it without the soda first, but I did prefer it with just a small amount to cut the sweetness. I have La Gitana Manzanilla and Lustau Amontillado in my cabinet as well, and I am going to try them here too when it is their turn to be open... The bonal/sherry/cynar combination is, for me, one of those synergistic and magical things, and I am so grateful that you made the initial suggestion.

  • Reply to: Spanish Sigh   by   4 years 2 months ago

    Christina,

    Interesting... did the soda work? I'd guess that with East India, the base would be sweet enough to stand up to the drying out effects of the soda.

    Thanks,

    Zachary

  • Reply to: Spanish Sigh   by   4 years 2 months ago

    Today I played with this a bit- it is still one of my favorite drinks, but I wanted something lighter, like a Duplex. I tried 1:.5:.5 Bonal:East India Solera Sherry: Cynar with an orange twist, Spanish bitters, and a little soda. I'm quite happy with it- thank you for giving me the idea to put these ingredients in the same glass!

  • Reply to: The Shift Drink   by   4 years 2 months ago

    Thanks for the tip- I'll keep an eye out for the King's. I've never seen it, but Washington state is transitioning to privatized liquor sales, which I hope will translate to better selection...

  • Reply to: The Shift Drink   by   4 years 2 months ago

    Christina, you might want to try King's Ginger - a new ginger liqueur which i think has a much stronger ginger flavor. It's about the same price as the canton so it's not cheap, but i like it for mixed drinks a lot more. That said, ginger syrup (or even really muddled ginger) can often do the trick.

  • Reply to: The Shift Drink   by   4 years 2 months ago

    I like this better with homemade ginger syrup. I probably won't buy another bottle of Canton when mine is gone since the ginger flavor is just too subdued.

  • Reply to: The Shift Drink   by   4 years 2 months ago

    Quite tart. Reducing the lemon juice to 1/2 oz would probably be good. Otherwise, fantastic.

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