Recent comments

  • Reply to: East Village Athletic Club Cocktail   by   4 years 3 months ago

    Curated slightly - changed .5 quarts of Grand Marnier to .5 oz to reflect the proportions of the cited recipe. Added page number attribution.

  • Reply to: Black Lodge   by   4 years 3 months ago

    "The black dog runs at night."

    In this case, the black dog is me. And tonight I'm running back to the kitchen to make another!

  • Reply to: Drink of Laughter and Forgetting   by   4 years 3 months ago

    Weirdly, I created The Deaf without any knowledge of either drink. Good stuff just comes together, I guess.

  • Reply to: Jupiter's Acorn   by   4 years 3 months ago

    This sounds delicious. I think it might work well with rye instead of the rhum as well.

  • Reply to: Death Is Not The End   by   4 years 3 months ago

    Fresh pressed, but I've found that cloudy, not-from-concentrate pineapple juice from a carton works perfectly well too. I like Trader Joe's: http://www.traderjoes.com/fearless-flyer/article.asp?article_id=39

    Give it a shot. Curious to know what you think.

  • Reply to: Death Is Not The End   by   4 years 3 months ago

    Interesting, the fernet/pineapple combo reminds me of this:

    http://cocktailvirgin.blogspot.com/2010/08/bartender-on-acid.html

    But Chartreuse with a bit of salt to match the fernet bitterness sounds more appealing than S&C, which I thought dominated the drink. I'll have to give this a shot...

    Did you use canned pineapple or fresh pressed?

  • Reply to: Ramona Flowers   by   4 years 3 months ago

    Self-curated to include new ingredient options.

  • Reply to: Drink of Laughter and Forgetting   by   4 years 3 months ago

    Tasty. I agree, no syrup needed.

  • Reply to: Smoking Jacket   by   4 years 3 months ago

    Had to check the book to see if I made the error there. -Whew!-

  • Reply to: Eeyore's Requiem   by   4 years 3 months ago

    Delicious. Bitter and refreshing. The Campari/Cynar/vermouth is the center of the drink: the Campari is definitely in control, but the Cynar adds interesting herbal/honeyed/savory accents; the blanc vermouth lightens it all up and adds wine, vanilla, and orange notes. Subtle mint from the Fernet and botanical complexity from the Tanq. Some unexpected leather notes on the way down. The orange oil upfront is worth the three twists. I made this half-sized and upon my first sip immediately wished I'd made more.

  • Reply to: Broken Flower   by   4 years 3 months ago

    Wow, this changes every sip, it seems. Love it!

  • Reply to: Vlad the Imbiber   by   4 years 3 months ago

    Thanks to both of you for the helpful suggestions. I don't have Zirbenz (though I'm a fan), but I do have a (white) vin doux naturale, so I may mix it, some red berry syrup, and London Dry to approximate the Mirto, or I may make a winter spiced syrup and mix that with gin instead. Thanks again.

  • Reply to: Ramona Flowers   by   4 years 3 months ago

    Out of curiosity, I subbed in 1scant tsp rose water for the violette tonight. Really good. I'll have to try it again when I'm not so low on rye, but I think I might prefer it this way.

  • Reply to: Vlad the Imbiber   by   4 years 3 months ago

    Hmm.. for Mirto, probably 2 parts Banyuls (or other red Vin Doux Naturale) and 1 part London Dry gin.

  • Reply to: Army & Navy   by   4 years 3 months ago

    I added a little cherry vanilla bitters to nice effect.

  • Reply to: Vlad the Imbiber   by   4 years 3 months ago

    Mirto has an earthy, woodsy evergreeen flavor, with some but modest sugar. If you happen to have Zirbenz Stone Pine liqueur, I'd use that, but less since it is stronger in flavor intensity. Lacking that, probably a heavy-juniper gin would be about as close as I can think of using common ingredients. Adjust the sugar as needed.

  • Reply to: Vlad the Imbiber   by   4 years 3 months ago

    Any good substitutions for the Mirto? I'm meaning to buy Tremontis but I don't have space in the budget for it right now.

  • Reply to: French Toast Flip   by   4 years 3 months ago

    Thanks a lot. East India Solera might work well too. I think with Oloroso it's already plenty sweet.

  • Reply to: French Toast Flip   by   4 years 3 months ago

    I reached out to Erick via Twitter and he confirmed the use of a sweeter Sherry, saying that Dry Sack 15 (which is 78% Oloroso and 22% Pedro Ximinez) works well. Some people might find that quite sweet - If you have both Oloroso and PX sherry lying around, try it with straight Oloroso, then add PX to taste.

  • Reply to: Piggly Quigley   by   4 years 3 months ago

    Inspired by this recipe (and lacking some of the ingredients above), I did one with: 1.5 Bourbon (Makers); 0.5 Cynar; 0.5 Dry Vermouth; 0.25 Luxardo Maraschino; 1 dash Absinthe. Stirred. I may have drifted a little too far to call mine a variation, but it was tasty.

  • Reply to: French Toast Flip   by   4 years 3 months ago

    As of April 2012, you can't sweeten Oloroso sherry and still call it Oloroso - these have to be labelled as "Cream" or some other branded name. I have a feeling that since the producer and bottling is called out in the recipe, this should be Oloroso Sherry, Lustau.

    Thanks,

    Zachary

  • Reply to: Tango 'til They're Sore   by   4 years 3 months ago

    I'd like to try this with a half ounce of Bénédictine in place of the Maraschino, as a kind of nouveau Vieux Carré.... If anyone has any success with that variation, let me know! I need to acquire a bottle of Bénédictine first.

  • Reply to: Tango 'til They're Sore   by   4 years 3 months ago

    Well in that case I agree--especially about the bread.

  • Reply to: Tango 'til They're Sore   by   4 years 3 months ago

    While I haven't yet tried the Fritz or its predecessor, the Gerty, I guess by "unique," I meant the flavor profile. I would assume that the gin botanicals in the Fritz and the Pastis in the Gerty would be more present in those variations. The carraway flavor is neat to me because of its association to rye bread--my 2nd favorite use of that grain. ;P

  • Reply to: Tango 'til They're Sore   by   4 years 3 months ago

    I used Redemption Rye, which is the same juice (LDI) as the Dickel, and also found that cool mint/carraway accord you mention... going to try this with Rittenhouse 100 once I buy another bottle this weekend, the added proof should stand up nicely to the other ingredients. Glad you liked it! And I can't take too much credit for it being unique; I just took the recipe from the Fritz, subbed rye for the gin, and cut back slightly on the Maraschino. Still, I think I prefer it this way, and I'm glad it worked for you even with your (smart) substitutions.

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