Recent comments

  • Reply to: Something Bitter This Way Comes   by   3 years 8 months ago

    I don't think they're similar - Amer Picon is heavy and caramelly, like Ramazzotti or other dark amaro. The Amer Nouvelle (IIRC) is a lighter spirit designed to show off the orange and gentian in a more neutral base. I'm getting them when they come to Texas, and will taste them side by side.

    Thanks,

    Zachary

  • Reply to: Something Bitter This Way Comes   by   3 years 8 months ago

    Hmm, dunno! Would like to hear about it if you find out.

  • Reply to: Cynar Sour   by   3 years 8 months ago

    A great idea. I made this drink with honey because the agave nectar is not easy to find here (Argentina) and is really good.

  • Reply to: The Little Sparrow   by   3 years 8 months ago

    Delicious cocktail with a smooth flavor. The St. Germain and bitters helps round out the rich flavor of Calvados. Couldn't drink more than 1 or 2, though.

  • Reply to: Something Bitter This Way Comes   by   3 years 8 months ago

    Um, I'm jealous :) I have been thinking about ordering the Bittermens Amere Nouvelle... Wonder how similar they are?

  • Reply to: Something Bitter This Way Comes   by   3 years 8 months ago

    I just mixed a version with Amer Picon in place of the CioCiaro and it is divine. Not too sweet in the least. 5/5.

  • Reply to: Big Apple   by   3 years 8 months ago

    I had the sherry out so I just made this and it is very accurately named. I used Carpano and it somehow makes the Laird's taste more apple-y. Definitely an easy drinking cocktail. Thanks!

  • Reply to: Monk's Revenge   by   3 years 8 months ago

    Way too sweet for me, as I suspected it would be. This is a cocktail for someone who likes to sip Benedictine neat. I inverted the ratio of Benedictine to rye and added 1/2 oz of lemon and thought it was then enjoyable, but not spectacular.

  • Reply to: 21st Century   by   3 years 8 months ago

    I liked to up the cacao a bit. Mine was more 3:2:1 (teq, cac, lem) or maybe 4:2:1. I also added a splash of cointreau.

  • Reply to: Grand Autumn   by   3 years 8 months ago

    Curated this a bit: Changed the recipe from a ratio to ounces - we prefer drinks this way. A Collins glass is around 10 ounces, so setting a parts drink to 3 (so 6 oz Rye, 3 oz St. Germain, and 2 1/4 oz lime) would not work. We would also prefer an amount of ginger beer instead of "fill the glass", as people's glasses are different. Finally, Kindred Cocktails assumes people are going to use fresh lime juice and other high quality ingredients.

    Thanks,

    Zachary

  • Reply to: Lazy Bear   by   3 years 8 months ago

    I had the small hands - brought a bottle back with me from California. It's great, but not available here and somewhat overpowering. I usually cut the amount by a dash or two in drinks like the Japanese that are Orgeat heavy. In old recipes it always seems like Orgeat was weaker and Grenadine was stronger back then...

  • Reply to: Lazy Bear   by   3 years 8 months ago

    BZA,

    Yeah.... my understanding is that the two best widely available orgeats are the BG Reynolds and the Small Hands versions. I make my own (the recipe I use is the one in the article), but I tend to like orange flower and rosewater more than most people ;)

    Thanks,

    Zachary

  • Reply to: Lazy Bear   by   3 years 8 months ago

    I have that in my suggestions, but I'm currently having an Orgeat identity crisis right now where I'm not crazy about homemade but I can't find the perfect store bought. Still looking for the Kassatly Chtaura Meehan recommends in PDT. Do you use homemade?

  • Reply to: Lazy Bear   by   3 years 8 months ago

    Dan, not sure what proof the Ryan and Wood is (I've seen it on shelves but have yet to try any of their liquors), but I used Rittenhouse because I figured I'd need the extra proof specifically because S&C is so overpowering. I used a local honey for my syrup, and the resulting drink was pleasingly floral - you could taste the S&C, but it was merged with other things. If you used honey rather than syrup, you probably ended up with a lot of it still in the shaker...

  • Reply to: Pompelmo   by   3 years 8 months ago

    I like the touch of sweetness that comes from lemon-lime soda, kinda balances out the bitter. Maybe I'll try with San Pellegrino Lemon or Orange Sparkling water as well.

  • Reply to: Indochine   by   3 years 8 months ago

    Didn't have Zacapa 23 on hand so substituted Zaya Grand Riserva 12yr instead. Unique cocktail but may be a little too rich for my taste. I'll try it with Barbancourt 15yr and up it to 1 1/4, minus the simple syrup and see how that works.

  • Reply to: Lazy Bear   by   3 years 8 months ago

    I need to revisit this. I used honey and needed the full 3/8 oz to make it sweet enough for the lime. My Ryan and Wood rye didn't stand up to the Smith & Cross; I think something like Wild Turkey would have worked better. I added another 3/4 oz of rye and it worked better. I also think my generic honey was a bit milquetoast.

  • Reply to: Pompelmo   by   3 years 8 months ago

    Curated to revert to the the authentic recipe. Altered version suggested substituting 7-Up for seltzer. The authentic recipe is more true to the spirit of Kindred Cocktails. Feel free to use the Your Comments section of your cocktail book entry to track your personal preferences. Thanks much for posting!

  • Reply to: Lazy Bear   by   3 years 8 months ago

    Sounds really good - you might want to try the Dover to Calais, which keeps the lime and Smith & Cross, but has Green Chartreuse and orgeat. 

    Thanks,

    Zachary

  • Reply to: Lazy Bear   by   3 years 8 months ago

    Unexpectedly incredible - maybe my favorite thing to do with Smith and Cross ever. I lowered the honey syrup to 1/2 oz, which perfect worked for me.

  • Reply to: Unicycle (Drink Lab 10)   by   3 years 8 months ago

    Tried this again. No kumquats on hand, so I muddled a small clementine with 2 swaths of lemon peel. Used Averna instead of Cointreau. Added a dash of Bokers and two of Regans'. Upped lemon to 1oz. Good, but not as good as it was with kumquats, I think.

  • Reply to: The Yellow Fizzle   by   3 years 8 months ago

    Dan,

    Whisking the hot milk into the dry shaken mixture is meant to mimic a swizzle - it also ensures that you don't make scrambled eggs ;)

    I would substitute Angostura for the Swizzle bitters, but you could always email Adam Elmegirab ;)

    Thanks,

    Zachary

  • Reply to: My Fair Gael   by   3 years 8 months ago

    Sounds like a great recipe, and a good intro to Scotch-like cocktails. I'll definitely be trying this!

    The instructions seem to have a bug. If you put the lemon juice, sugar, and bitters into an ice-filled mixing glass, how can you muddle them? You don't seem to be muddling the lemon itself, so perhaps we could measure the juice by volume (which is much more reproducible by other people). Maybe something like 1/2 oz lemon juice with instructions like "muddle sugar cube, bitters and lemon juice, add rest and ice, shake, strain, straight up, cocktail glass, garnish". We assume a knowledgeable reader so that basic instructions don't have to be repeated in every recipe.

    Also, feel free to put your real name in as creator, if you'd like.

  • Reply to: The Yellow Fizzle   by   3 years 8 months ago

    Not sure I get the swizzle part. What would you sub for these unobtainium-based bitters?

  • Reply to: Czech it at the Door   by   3 years 8 months ago

    A nice drink, although I fiddled with it a bit. I used only 1/4 oz simple, but then I tend to like my drinks without detectable sweetness. I upped the rye to 1 1/2 oz to get it to stand up to the Becherovka. I added 2 dashes of Regans' orange bitters, which reinforces the orange notes from the twist and adds significant bitterness (since Becherovka is so mild). I really enjoyed this drink, especially since it highlights an unusual ingredient that is pretty widely available.

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