Recent comments

  • Reply to: Mai Tai (Trader Vic's)   by   3 years 5 months ago

    Bingo. You're absolutely right. The previous recipe was a train wreck. Updated to the 1972 Trader Vic's recipe, which is a close approximation to the original, given that the origin 17 year old J Wrap Jamaican rum is no longer available. Thanks for pointing this out.

  • Reply to: Yellow Parrot   by   3 years 5 months ago

    A lot of things from this period of time are unbalanced to today's palate. I tread very carefully if I see a cocktail coming from Duffy or the 1937 UK Bartender's Guild book.

    Thanks,

    Zachary

  • Reply to: Yellow Parrot   by   3 years 5 months ago

    I just mixed a version with Mata Hari absinthe, which has a mild presence of anise and is therefore a good mixer in cocktails, IMHO. I thought the herbal balance between the absinthe and Chartreuse was nice, but the intense syrupy sweetness was a little much. 4/5 stars.

  • Reply to: Rusty Automaton   by   3 years 5 months ago

    Throw?

  • Reply to: The Crafty and Elusive Elk   by   3 years 5 months ago

    Awesome, unusual, and non-intuitive. You would not think that the Maraschino and smoke would work together, but they definitely do.

  • Reply to: Mai Tai (Trader Vic's)   by   3 years 5 months ago

    Grenadine? Falernum? Light rum? Dark rum float? No curacao?
    I think the current accepted standard recipe is 2oz of rum (both dark or amber, and of different styles in order to make for a more dynamic flavor), 1oz of lime juice, 1/2oz orange curacao, 1/4oz orgeat, 1/4oz simple syrup. Garnished with half a spent lime and a mint sprig.
    Personally I double the orgeat, skip the simple syrup, and add a dash of Angostura. But I wouldn't put that in the recipe.

  • Reply to: Humos Regiel   by   3 years 5 months ago

    Curated this somewhat: The noters were duplicated - one set was removed. Added a note to the Chartreuse to reference the infusion. Updated attribution, and a link to the recipe. 

  • Reply to: Domfront   by   3 years 5 months ago

    Good catch. The original recipe source just called for Cointreau, but when I tried to enter that as the ingredient on KC, it didn't like it because that's a brand name. When I saw Cointreau listed as one of the brands under the Curacao ingredient, I assumed that meant Curacao was the correct generic ingredient name. I'll try to remember this in the future, but another way to keep it from happening again with others would be to remove Cointreau from the pull-down list of specific brands when the chosen ingredient is Curacao.

    Barsoom

  • Reply to: Drink Lab #16   by   3 years 5 months ago

    Christina,

    Do you have Luxardo cherries? Maybe 1 or 2 muddled into the Clear Creek would be the best approximation.

    Thanks,

    Zachary

  • Reply to: Drink Lab #16   by   3 years 5 months ago

    I feel so understocked, and this looks so good. I have american fruits sour cherry cordial and clear creek cherry liqueur. Would either of those work here? And no Burlesque bitters, but I have rhubarb...

  • Reply to: Campari Swizzle   by   3 years 5 months ago

    I really love this. Lots going on, but the overall effect is crisp and refreshing. Thank you for posting!

  • Reply to: Domfront   by   3 years 5 months ago

    Curated slightly to change Cointreau from a Curaçao to a Triple Sec, following the standard naming convention for Kindred Cocktails. When Curaçao was first made, there were "dry/sec" versions and "sweet/doux" versions (see here).

    By the time Cointreau was invented in 1875, they claimed that they were "Triple Sec" - a new category that was seen to transcend the sec/doux of Curaçao. Other companies copied the Triple Sec language off the Cointreau label, and it was eventually dropped.

    The problem is that today, the lines between Curaçao, orange liqueurs, and Triple Sec are blurred. But we tend to think of Cointreau as a Triple Sec.

    Thanks,

    Zachary

  • Reply to: The Hoskins Cocktail   by   3 years 5 months ago

    I don't think that Torani Amer and Amer Picon are alike at all (and I have both). I struggle with the whole gin + amaro pairing, but this is as good of a swing as I've seen outside the Negroni.

    Zachary

  • Reply to: The Hoskins Cocktail   by   3 years 5 months ago

    I can't really get past the fact that ANY drink that has more than .25 oz of maraschino is a MARASCHINO drink, and not a Torani Amer drink, etc. While this is a tasty tipple, I have to say it's a fail as far as highlighting the flavor of Torani Amer (or Amer Picon). Anyway, I love maraschino, so it's all good.

  • Reply to: Goya's Coup de Gras   by   3 years 5 months ago

    Curated to provide instructions, which are an educated guess right now.

  • Reply to: Autumn's Dawn   by   3 years 5 months ago

    Loved the flavours, but will make with less maple syrup next time... a bit too sweet for me.

  • Reply to: Trinidad Especial   by   3 years 5 months ago

    Curated to improve attribution and add a substitution idea for Mistral aged pisco.

  • Reply to: Moscow Mule   by   3 years 5 months ago

    Curated to revert recipe to the original as described by Wikipedia, which did not have bitters. Moved bitters to the Notes section.

  • Reply to: Bison Drop   by   3 years 6 months ago

    Curated to tweak the brand of orange bitters, and to move the instructions for making the honey syrup to the Notes section.

  • Reply to: Bamboo Monk   by   3 years 6 months ago

    Curated to fix the Sherry entry - all Amontillado Sherries are dry, and the brand here is Lustau.

    Thanks,

    Zachary

  • Reply to: Curari Cocktail   by   3 years 6 months ago

    So thanks to the kindness of a stranger ;) I now have a bottle of Cora. This is definitely in the fall-and-winter set of cocktails. The ruby Port does get a bit lost up front, but contributes dried fruit tones to the midpalate. This shines on the finish, with lots of cream-coconut flavors and allspice that lingers. Maybe half Port and half Clear Creek cranberry liqueur next time? 

    Thanks,

    Zachary

  • Reply to: Bonal & Rye   by   3 years 6 months ago

    So, this isn't exactly the same drink, but .25 oz gran classico instead of the cointreau and bitters is really good.

  • Reply to: The Beauty Beneath   by   3 years 6 months ago

    I haven't opened my bottle of Vergano Americano yet. I was hoping for a less expensive but equally good alternative to Cocchi Barolo Chinato- maybe this isn't it. I'll probably start with half the cointreau when I get to trying this, as that ingredient takes over pretty quickly for me. A little citrus does sound good too.

  • Reply to: The Beauty Beneath   by   3 years 6 months ago

    A bit sweet for my taste. The Vergano Americano is a touch mild-mannered. I added a 1/2 oz of lime (although maybe lemon would have better) and like it more.

  • Reply to: Egg Nog   by   3 years 6 months ago

    Is there anything you don't know about ingredients? Sheesh! I haven't tried this yet, but I don't care for egg nog that is too thick.

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