Recent comments

  • In Vida Veritas   3 years 10 weeks ago

    Wow, clash of the titans! I need to try this. Usually I can imagine drinks pretty well in my head, but this one makes my head hurt before I drink it.

  • Honeymoon Cocktail   3 years 11 weeks ago

    I got this recipe from Ted Haigh's book. I'm guessing the curacao got lot when I imported it from one database to the other because of the c-cedilla.

  • The Riviera   3 years 11 weeks ago

    Alrighty.... round 2: Dropped the simple out completely, used the egg white. This is much less sweet, but also not as textured. This is decent enough, but it's missing something. The mint does nothing as a garnish, as the egg white foam mutes most of the aroma of the cocktail. Frustrating.

  • Honeymoon Cocktail   3 years 11 weeks ago

    Corey,

    I flagged this for moderation with Dan - he'll clean it up. Can you post a link to the proper recipe? Thanks.

  • Honeymoon Cocktail   3 years 11 weeks ago

    This appears to be missing half an ounce of curaçao.

  • Fritz   3 years 11 weeks ago

    Yes, that really is 3/4 oz of Peychaud's. If you work out the price per ounce, it's not bad.

  • Fritz   3 years 12 weeks ago

    It that really 3/4 oz of Peychaud's? That'll really put a dent in your bitters bottle!

  • Flowering Fields   3 years 12 weeks ago

    OK, I replenished my green Chartreuse, and made this with it. I would strongly recommend dropping the pineapple to 3/4 oz and using 1/2 oz of Chartreuse if you're going that way. I know EV is hard to find, but it's worth it.

  • French Cola   3 years 12 weeks ago

    Nice! I haven't tried it, but Tom is an awesome guy with a great palate. Very passionate cocktail nerd. This drink sounds tasty!

  • Arbusto Oaxaca 2   3 years 12 weeks ago

    Sorry! I used approximately 32 oz of freshly pitted Bing cherries, and the shrub base was poured over them in a jar to cover. Then I let the mix macerate sealed at ambient temp for a week, shaking daily. I decanted tonight and triple strained the mix for clarity's sake into a clean jar.

  • Arbusto Oaxaca 2   3 years 12 weeks ago

    Your cherry shrub recipe seems to be lacking, um, cherries?

  • Torres del Paine   3 years 12 weeks ago

    Thanks for hosting, filip. For the interested, here's filip's write-up on this MxMo: http://www.adventuresincocktails.com/2011/06/21/mxmo-lviii-niche-spirits...

  • Torres del Paine   3 years 12 weeks ago

    Gonna have to give this a try, it sounds great. Thanks for the MxMo submission Dan.

  • French Pearl   3 years 12 weeks ago

    Corrected lime juice to reflect Absinthe, added Pastis variation and history

  • French Pearl   3 years 12 weeks ago

    Provided attribution, more detailed instructions, and corrected Absinthe to be Pernod Absinthe

  • The Riviera   3 years 13 weeks ago

    Updated notes to suggest reducing or omitting the simple and the suggestion to flip the Campari and Maraschino. This is one of those "interesting" recipes where the modified inauthentic recipe is probably better than the original for most peoples' taste.

  • Plain shrub   3 years 13 weeks ago

    Rob,

    As you're the KC King of Shrubs, your advice, and any tips on hot vs cold methodology is greatly appreciated.

  • Plain shrub   3 years 13 weeks ago

    Dan, this is exactly my technique for making plain shrub, or shrub base. With enough shaking or stirring the demarara will dissolve into the vinegar(s) to make a fine juice extraction medium, or as in Ye Olde Quencher an interesting additive in itself. Using this in a week's extraction from chosen fruit in a sealed jar with ambient temp produces good results. Neyah White in San Francisco is my mentor re 'cold' macerated shrub, which method prevents a 'cooked' or caramelized taste from being part of the product.

    The rice/cider vinegar combo works for me in most tries, but obviously can be changed up by the maker to suit individual taste. Playing with the vinegar(s) will produce nice variants with particular fruits.

  • The Riviera   3 years 13 weeks ago

    Drinking this now, with flipped Campari & Maraschino ratios, as suggested by Dan, and without the eggwhite. This smells nice due to the mint and orange bitters, and is pleasant enough, but I think it's a bit sweet, and not quite bitter enough to effect compexity in the drink. A pleasant harmony does arise from the pineapple, Campari and Maraschino, but I'd drop the simple to 1/2 oz or even 1/4, and I might either up the Campari in the drink (not the mix) or add more mint and muddle it first.

    So here's the way I figure it. The infusion has a bit more than 1/2 oz of Maraschino in the 2 oz used, and coupled with 3/4 oz of simple, it's really sweet. If you count Maraschino effective as sweet as simple, 1/4 oz simple with the infusion gives you an equal parts sour. 

  • Buah Arak   3 years 13 weeks ago

    Not sure how that lambanog will taste, actually. I've heard that Pinoys flavor lambanog with bubble gum flavoring and such, so I'll have to hunt down the real deal when I get there in November. Last trip there I tried the local rum Tanduay, and the gold stuff is passable in an Old Fashioned variant with calamansi and simple syrup.
    I'm thinking of a toddy (or more properly a skin) with batavia arrack...something with arrack, hot water, lemon peel and spiced butter. That will probably be your "Hot Buttered Stripper Pole" =) Stay tuned.

  • Buah Arak   3 years 13 weeks ago

    Rob,

    Check out the 17th Century cocktail, which I made to get over my fear of Batavia Arrack. I bet that lambanog smells like suntan oil!

  • Buah Arak   3 years 13 weeks ago

    Depending on one's taste and mood, buttered stripper pole might be fun! You know Zach, one of these days I'm gonna make a batavia arrack cocktail called "Buttered Stripper Pole" just for you!
    Speaking of arrack, I hope to try its Pinoy relative lambanog in the Philippines later this year.

  • Flowering Fields   3 years 13 weeks ago

    Second go round - I updated the rye to Bulleit - it has a strong, piney/minty greenness that works with this cocktail. This smells rather cute and tropical. The lime and pineapple dominates. On the palate, though, this is fairly firm, with definite notes of the rye, mint, and licorice on a sweet-and-sour frame. The finish is where this shines, with the absinthe and Chartreuse working in harmony to develop minty-spicy flavors that linger.

  • Torres del Paine   3 years 13 weeks ago

    Dan, this looks lovely, I love the backstory as well. I was quite surprised by the Chilean Capel pisco, enjoy playing with it, and I'm glad you featured it for MixMo. And the choice of amari is lovely as well - I'm off to Cirace in the North End this weekend to get the Gran Classico! This drink will whet my appetite for complex bitter in a sipper.

  • Combier Rouge   3 years 13 weeks ago

    Quick question though... did you comment in the article page or hit the button for moderation? I'm trying to figure out how it works ;)