Recent comments

  • Reply to: Bumblebee   by   4 years 2 months ago

    The linked recipe calls for 1.5 t honey, not 1.5 oz.

  • Reply to: Dark and Orangey   by   4 years 2 months ago

    Significantly revised to be less orange, more ginger-forward, spicier, and less sweet.

  • Reply to: Peg Leg Punch   by   4 years 3 months ago

    I cleaned this up a bit - changed Almond syrup, Monin orgeat to Orgeat, Monin. Removed references to fresh juices and mint - KC assumes this already.

  • Reply to: Lost Cause   by   4 years 3 months ago

    This does sound crazy, but plausible. Call Mythbusters.

    Re the <a href="http://stvincentsyrups.com/products.php">St. Vincent Syrups Coconut "cream"</a>. From the website, it sounds closer to a syrup, and it does not sound like Coco Lopez would be an adequate substitute. Or maybe Coco Lopez plus some Velvet Falernum?

    <cite>This is beautiful collaboration of ginger, clove, and cardamom infused into a mixture of water, coconut cream, and cane sugar. Great for creating lighter style mocktails and cocktails with some strong flavor and a nice creamy texture.</cite>

  • Reply to: Lost Cause   by   4 years 3 months ago

    This sounds weird as shit but I love the crafty and elusive elk so I'll have to try it. Thanks, and keep 'em coming!

  • Reply to: Dirt 'n Diesel   by   4 years 3 months ago

    I saw a rendition of this at a local favorite bar of mine using Pyrat XO Reserve. As I love that rum I tried my hand at it at home. One of the best rum cocktails I've had in a long time.

  • Reply to: Weeski   by   4 years 3 months ago

    Adjusted the Cointreau quantity down from 3/4oz to 1tsp after thirtyoneknots noticed that the original used a lot less. This sounds like a much better drink to me

  • Reply to: Hastings Sunrise   by   4 years 3 months ago

    I think that sugar would reduce proof, tie things together, and help the texture of the drink. Perhaps muddling a sugar cube with the lemon peel, then adding lemon juice and bitters and swirling to dissolve, then the alcohol, ice and shake, strain, up.

    Thanks,

    Zachary

  • Reply to: Hastings Sunrise   by   4 years 3 months ago

    I'm still really playing around with this one, but so far, it's been about an inch wide by about 3 long. I'm trying to come up with something that takes the Kirsch for what it is, but lightens its heavy alcohol nose and the burn... Trying to take it and turn it into a nice, cool sipper, I guess. Riffing on this general idea, I found that adding a small dash of Campari went well with it too.

    Definitely something still in the works. I will tame this Kirsch. I will do it.

  • Reply to: Hastings Sunrise   by   4 years 3 months ago

    How much lemon zest in the muddling step?

    Thanks,

    Zachary

  • Reply to: Amaretto Sour (Jeffrey Morgenthaller)   by   4 years 3 months ago

    I tried this (although without the simple). I guess the "world's best Amaretto Sour" is like the world's best Appletini. It was enjoyable, and the Booker's definitely helps. I used Luxardo Amaretto, perhaps the best available. I tried it and then doubled the Booker's. I would make this for someone looking for an accessible cocktail. The egg white makes a very nice foam, although without the added simple, it was a bit alum-like.

  • Reply to: Mah Nà Mah Nà   by   4 years 3 months ago

    My childhood is now ruined ;)

  • Reply to: Mah Nà Mah Nà   by   4 years 3 months ago
  • Reply to: Mah Nà Mah Nà   by   4 years 3 months ago

    I'll give that a try. The Martinez is one of my favorite drinks, and I've tried making it with a few gins (Genever being my favorite actually)- I never thought to try the Ransom, which is silly since it is an Old Tom Gin and all...

  • Reply to: Mah Nà Mah Nà   by   4 years 3 months ago

    imho, while it is great in other things, Ransom was made for one drink and one drink alone: the Martinez. Made with Carpano and Boker's, it's one of my all-time favs. I wouldn't put Ransom in many other drinks except those that specifically call for it (similar to Smith and Cross).

  • Reply to: Boston Common   by   4 years 3 months ago

    Cocchi would be pretty different (but possibly also good). It might get lost with the Nardini. I think Bonal would work, although it would not be as bitter. Hey, it's just a recipe; experiment!

  • Reply to: Black Dahlia   by   4 years 3 months ago

    I made this with St. George products: their raspberry liqueur, buddha's hand vodka and Firelit coffee liqueur. Was skeptical, but these flavors are fabulous together -- the coffee and raspberry comes through as a chocolate note. Very nice balance of sweet, bitter, and sour.

  • Reply to: Boston Common   by   4 years 3 months ago

    This looks amazing. I have too many bottles of vermouth open right now, but this is first on my list of things to make when I open a bottle of Punt e Mes (unless you think Cocchi or Bonal could work with modification)

  • Reply to: Mah Nà Mah Nà   by   4 years 3 months ago

    I have a bottle of Ransom Old Tom gin, and I'm just not crazy about the flavor it imparts to most of my favorite gin drinks. It works very nicely here, however- better than the suggested Aviation in my opinion. I have a bottle of Strega that I'm trying to finish, and in this particular case it made a fine sub for the yellow Chartreuse. I used Krogstad aquavit, which I prefer to Linie as it is smoother and the spice flavors are more forward.

  • Reply to: Advanced Craft Cocktail Theory: Texture   by   4 years 3 months ago
  • Reply to: Vieux Mot   by   4 years 3 months ago

    Jim Meehan made both version and concluded 1/2 oz simple with an extra 2 seconds of shake time.

  • Reply to: Vieux Mot   by   4 years 3 months ago

    I spoke with Jim Meehan, author of the PDT Cocktail Book. He makes the excellent point that recipes are not fixed in time, but rather evolve. The cocktail was created in 2007 (when the LA Times recipe was published) and the PDT Cocktail book was researched and published in 2009. It's 2012 as I write this.

    Palates change. The acidity of the lemon juice varies. Some patrons prefer sour; others sweet. Sometimes even ingredients change (although not in this case). He said that he would remake the recipe and let me know his thoughts, but if asked right now to make one for a patron of unknown / unspecified desire for sweetness, he would use 1/4 oz of simple. PDT uses 1:1 syrup. Remember that the PDT Cocktail Book reflects how PDT prefers to make cocktails, which may differ slightly from how the creator made them. My thanks go out to Jim. He is clearly a man of passion and diligence.

  • Reply to: Vieux Mot   by   4 years 3 months ago

    It makes more sense as 1/4 oz simple so that it's a 1:1 sour.

    Thanks,

    Zachary

  • Reply to: Vieux Mot   by   4 years 3 months ago

    User brxn has pointed out that the PDT Cocktail book calls for 1/2 simple, yet the linked 2007 LA Times recipes calls for only 1/4 oz. I have found 1/4 oz to be adequate, but I've written Jim Meehan for clarification. I'll post an update when he replies.

  • Reply to: House Call   by   4 years 3 months ago

    I tried this with some trepidation, but this isn't bad- maybe what an appletini wants to be. I rarely reach for my applejack (laird's) or sloe gin (bitter truth) and am trying to find good ways to utilize them so I can make room for something else. The tart/apple/herbal combination is nice, though on the sweet side.

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