Recent comments

  • A Long Day   10 weeks 4 days ago

    Really nice, well-balanced cocktail. Only had Cazadores reposado around, but it played nicely.

  • Teenage Riot   11 weeks 12 hours ago

    Just had this again at Flatiron Lounge. What a drink. The spice of the rye and vermouth create a Bénédictine-like effect and the Amontilado adds a savory chocolate finish. Delicious front to back.

  • Clover Club   11 weeks 1 day ago

    I made this both ways tonight, and it definitely needs the dry vermouth. I also like the 6:3:3:1 ratio. Interestingly, the raspberry + lemon makes pink grapefruit in the same way the Jasmine does with Campari + lemon.

    Thanks,

    Zachary

  • Harvest Moon   11 weeks 1 day ago

    Quite interesting. Well done, complex. Made with Wild Turkey Rare Breed and Apple-ation Davis Family apple brandy (Sonoma). A little hot, perhaps because of the 108 proof Rare Breed. Potent.

  • The Thunderdome   11 weeks 1 day ago

    Good, but Fernet-y. Must be in the mood for Fernet. Made with Michter's and smoked ice cube. A good intro to Fernet Branca as the flavor profile is still the most prominent, but more subdued. If some one said "Never had it, would like to try it." I'd make them this.

  • Hemingway Daiquiri   11 weeks 1 day ago

    Holy f**k Dan. You need to give this drink a name. I haven't made the original Hemingway yet, but it's going to be hard to convince me it's better than your version here. It's worth anyone buying W&N just to make this.

  • Vieux Carré   11 weeks 1 day ago

    I've been experimenting with different combos, looking to make a batch to put into a small (2 litre) charred oak keg for aging. My current combo consists of Old Overholt rye, Carpano Antica, Couvoisier VS, with the requisite herbals and bitters. Tonight, I tried a version using "house bitters" my wife brewed up (recipe courtesy of Brad Parson's "Bitters" book)...they're a little more earthy, dark, and less spicy than Angostura, and I think it allows the Benedictine's herbalness to cut through a bit. I also err on the shy side of the Benedictine and vermouth, preferring a little more bite to my drink. I think I'm getting close...just finished the first one, and I'm going to make a second, but using a stronger rye (Redemption? Don't know...wish I had my trusty handle of Beam Rye, but it disappeared during the holidays...).

    Love this site...keep drinking, my friends.

  • The Margarita, or An Earthy Mystery   11 weeks 1 day ago

    ...partially.

    The martini IS the most abused cocktail. If I see one more chocolate syrup and whip cream laced dusted with cinnamon sugar concoction called a martini I'ma gonna go all postal and slip some ghost pepper bitters into it whilst the b**** isn't looking!

    BUT, I will not diss someone who prefers vodka over gin. That's what make's UhmeriKKKa great!

  • Lovecraft in Brooklyn   11 weeks 2 days ago

    Randomly stumbled upon this drink and gave it another whirl and I still like it. I think Rittenhouse is the way to go (not sure why I went with Overholt initially) and I used PX sherry instead of madeira since my bottle of Blandy's is a bit past it's prime. Also skipped the rock and served it down. Not bad.

  • Sunny Disposition   11 weeks 2 days ago

    Rather tart with dry apricot brandy. Added a tsp of apricot liqueur and it needed more. Less lemon?

  • Clover Club   11 weeks 2 days ago

    I honestly have never made the version with dry vermouth before, but from the ratios that Cold Glass gives, it sounds fantastic. No objections from me.

  • Clover Club   11 weeks 3 days ago

    Does anyone have an issue if I fix this drink to this: http://cold-glass.com/2013/02/19/the-clover-club-cocktail/ - it's 1.5/.75/.75/.25. I can also add a note that it was originally 1:1:1:1 which is way too sweet for modern palates.

    Thanks,

    Zachary

  • Boulevardier 12   11 weeks 3 days ago

    Tried with Bulleit Rye, Punt e Mes, and Averna, with Fee Bros Aztec Chocolate Bitters and a navel orange peel, and it is divine! The Rye, PeM and Averna combo is dense and slightly spicy; a real winner.

  • Clover Club   11 weeks 3 days ago

    the PDT recipe: 2oz Plymouth Gin, 3/4oz lemon juice, 1/2oz simple syrup, 1 bsp Bonne Mamman raspberry preserves, and 1 egg white. Dry shake, shake w/ ice, and strain into a chilled egg coupe

  • Yankee Hotel Foxtrot   11 weeks 5 days ago

    Curated this slightly - thanks ezoh! Changed Removed Herb Liqueur from Cynar. Changed 3 oz of peach bitters to 3 dashes.

    Thanks,

    Zachary

  • Yankee Hotel Foxtrot   11 weeks 5 days ago

    It goes without saying - but I'm sure you meant 3 dashes of bitters and not 3 ounces!

  • Pegu Club Cocktail (via Andrew Willett)   11 weeks 5 days ago

    It is definitely valid to use language as most users have done for the better part of a century.
    The collateral damage, in this case, is that when you want to refer to a traditionally-correct cocktail, it is almost impossible to be understood.
    In 1900, if you asked a bar-tender for a Rum Cocktail, he would understand it to be a specific drink. He might ask you which sort of bitters you might want in it. He might also ask you whether you wanted it 'soft' (with sugar syrup and stirred through ice and strained) or 'old-fashioned' (starting with dry sugar and then served on-the-rocks). Whatever he asked or assumed, you would be able to get the Rum Cocktail.
    Today if you go into all but a very few bars and ask for a Rum Cocktail, the bar-tender will not realize that you are asking for a specific drink. He or she might ask you, "What do you mean, Rum & Coke, Piña Colada, Daiquiri..." and might even be annoyed in mistaking your request as being too vague.
    About seven years ago, my wife was able to get the Bourbon Cocktail at Seven Grand in downtown Los Angeles. A couple of years and staff incarnations later, she tried again. The bartenders at that whiskey-focused, supposedly pre-prohibition-type bar had no idea what she was talking about. When she explained it to them slowly and deferentially, they thought that she was telling them to stir and strain an 'Old-fashioned' (as if that were only one drink, rather than the old way to make a cocktail out of any liquor) and told her that they would not violate such a hallowed drink from tradition in the way she was suggesting. Such ignorance from those who wrap themselves in the pretense of American mixological tradition is breath-taking.
    Imagine a future time when the perceived sophistication of the word 'sushi' has caused its over-use to the point that it means nothing more than any food that is vaguely Asian. Too bad for anyone trying to get the real thing then.

  • Pegu Club Cocktail (via Andrew Willett)   11 weeks 5 days ago

    Hello Andrew/Mr. Willett,

    Thank you for the further information; it's quite useful. I appreciate your research and the rigor with which you always present it. I tend to be a bit less exacting than you in casual usage (I figure that nearly a century of use of "cocktail" as a generic term for an alcoholic mixed drink renders that usage valid), I find your standards refreshing and your research invaluable. Cheers.

  • Pegu Club Cocktail (via Andrew Willett)   11 weeks 5 days ago

    Greetings!
    Thank you for mentioning me in connection with this old drink and presenting it here in its original form as an alternative to the more modern re-working of it.
    I thought that I would mention that I had up-dated the article to explain what I mean by "liqueur of bitter orange peel." In as much brevity as I can manage, all true Curaçao liqueur is made of the peel of the special variety of the bitter orange that grows on the island of Curaçao. Traditional Curaçao liqueur uses only that type of peel, making it rather bitter, and thus needing a lot of sugar to balance it. The triple-sec ('triple dry,' in French) variety of Curaçao liqueur was made to allow for a less-sweet product by using part bitter orange peel and part sweet orange peel. Cointreau is the most famous brand of triple-sec Curaçao liqueur, and was originally described exactly as such on the label. Combier l'Original is also a triple-sec-type liqueur of bitter orange peel, and was also originally called "Curaçao blanc, triple-sec," like Cointreau), but modern Combier is made with bitter orange peel from Haiti, instead of Curaçao, and therefore is not Curaçao liqueur, strictly speaking (and according to French labeling law). Because not all liqueur of bitter orange peel is made of the peel of the Curaçao orange and some of them are still quite good (like Combier), I call it "liqueur of bitter orange peel" in all of my recipes. This also allows the mixer to select either the very-bitter-and-very-sweet traditional variety, or the less-bitter-and-less-sweet triple-sec variety.
    My original post can be found by following the link below:
    http://elementalmixology.wordpress.com/2014/01/17/the-pegu-club-aint-the...

  • Fernando   11 weeks 5 days ago

    DrunkLab, thanks for the info! And thank you for presenting it in a manner that made me lol at least twice.

  • Aviation Cocktail   11 weeks 6 days ago

    That makes sense. I looked up how much a dash is and the first reference I saw said it's an 1/8 of tsp, so I was only using 1/4 tsp. I'll up it and see how it goes.
    Thanks!

  • Fernando   11 weeks 6 days ago

    In Argentina, a Fernet & Coca-Cola (effectively the national beverage) is sometimes called a Fernando. I don't know if the EO boys had that in mind when they named their decidedly not Coke-tasting beverage, but it could be the source, or perhaps both drinks draw from some older piece of Fernet lore I don't know about. Or maybe the EO guys are just huge ABBA fans.

  • Fernando   11 weeks 6 days ago

    Pretty impressed with this - a Fernet cocktail (with more than 1/4 oz. of the stuff) that I can get behind. I know it's an Employees Only original, but any ideas as to where the name comes from?

  • Aviation Cocktail   11 weeks 6 days ago

    I use 1/4 tsp per dash, so about 1/2 tsp for this, which I find gives a nice background floral aspect and a slight greyish color. There is always uncertainty in what a dash is, especially for an ingredient that doesn't come in a dasher bottle.

    Some use up to a 1/2 oz of Violette. There's no reason you shouldn't adjust this to your taste. You may have to adjust the lemon too.

  • Aviation Cocktail   11 weeks 6 days ago

    Jaba,

    I'm sure it's 2 dashes. You could try setting a "part" at 3/4 oz (which will make a small drink), or increasing the Violette until you like it.

    Thanks,

    Zachary