Recent comments

  • Reply to: Antihero   by   4 days 15 hours ago

    Fantastic. Cut the lime juice down to 3/4.

  • Reply to: Teresa 2   by   5 days 5 hours ago

    Quite nice. My cassis was rather oxidized and that came through under the Campari. I think it would be better with fresh vibrant cassis or some other berry-family liqueur. Stone fruit -- maybe apricot -- might work too. Without the gin, I think it would be cloying.

  • Reply to: South of No North   by   5 days 17 hours ago

    Corrected from chocolate bitters to coffee.

  • Reply to: Casino   by   5 days 23 hours ago

    Do yourself a favor and drop the amount of maraschino to a scant 1/4 oz. Add a bar spoon of simple to sweeten it up slightly.

  • Reply to: South of No North   by   6 days 8 hours ago

    The reference states 1 oz cold-brew coffee where this one states 1 oz bitters.

  • Reply to: Martini (Modern: 5:1)   by   6 days 23 hours ago

    <br />Lordy! Lordy! What a drink. This was my first martini, and I'm on the far side of 21 years. But let me explain why I liked this drink so much. First, I used Tanqueray Bloomsbury gin, which I like even more than Tangqueray Ten. Although Bloomsbury's a London dry gin, it has a great bouquet and it goes down very easily. Now here's where I deviated from the called for dry vermouth. I used, instead, Dolin Blanc (a semi-sweet vermouth), and finished it up with a lemon twist, making sure I had a nice amount of lemon flavoring expressed on top of the cocktail before I dropped the twist in. Light, tasty, and oh so easy going down. A memorable drink!

  • Reply to: Early Dismissal   by   1 week 1 day ago

    Made an approximation of this with spiced rum and hibiscus cardamom syrup from Portland Soda Works, but the result was great! A bit tart.

  • Reply to: Aristocrat   by   1 week 1 day ago

    This drink caught me by surprise, mostly because--I think--I've been drinking and loving amaro-based drinks for the last month. The Aristocrat is decidedly different from those wonderful amari; it's sweeter and lighter in taste. I would drink the Aristocrat before dinner or on a lazy do-nothing afternoon.

    There are several reasons why I like this drink: The greatest reason is the St. George terroir gin, which is exquisite to say the least. Its label reads like a who's who in the botanical world: "Douglas fir, California bay laurel, fennel, coastal sage, orris root, angelica root, juniper berries, and other profoundly aromatic botanical ingredients..." Pair a great gin with a top-shelf bianco vermouth by Dolin, and Cynat, plus subtle celery bitterrs, and you have a drink making you want another. So have it, and enjoy it!

    In closing, I should add that those who like that amaro bitterness will like this drink because of the St. George gin in combination with the Cynar. If you want less bitterness, use a botanical gin suchs as Tanqueray Bloomsbury or Ten, or Megellen Blue. The Aristocrat is, in my opinion, a cocktail for overyone.

  • Reply to: Tarleton's Resurrection   by   1 week 1 day ago

    a tad sweet/heavy for me as is, would up the lemon juice I think if I make again

  • Reply to: Raton Canyon Cocktail   by   1 week 2 days ago

    I can sum it up in three words: A FANTASTIC DRINK! I rated this drink as a five, something I raarely do. I rate a drink as a five when: the drink is relatively easy to fix, and does not take much time to prepare. Also, the ingredients are easy to obtain, and they can be used in a variety of drinks (I hate to buy an ingredient that is somewhat pricey--say $30 on up--and is used only for that drink); in short the ingredients are versatile, and a will not lanquish on the shelf for years, seldom used. Also, the drink is inherently tasty, it's not one that you have to "aquire" a taste for. Finally, it's a drink that is popular with the general public and has been popular for several decades--in short, not a fad.

    Drinks like the martini, or the old fashioned, or the Rob Roy are examples of drinks that I would rate a five, even though I, personally don't care for dry martinis. In my opinion, it's easy to justify a five rating for The Raton Canyon Cocktail: Only a few ingredients are needed, all of the ingredients are easy to find and buy; individually they aren't real expensive, and each ingredient is versatile, i.e. each one can be used in a variety of different cocktails In short, it's a very tasty drink, with only a few ingredients that blend together simply marverously into what I describe as a truly unforgettable.cocktail. Yes, with no doubt, the Raton Canyon Cocktail truly deserves a five rating. Bottoms up, but slowly, so you can enjoy a truly unforgettable drink.

  • Reply to: Raton Canyon Cocktail   by   1 week 2 days ago

    I can sum it up in three words: A FANTASTIC DRINK! I rated this drink as a five, something I raarely do. I rate a drink when: the drink is relatively easy to fix, and does not take much time to prepare. Also, the ingredients are easy to find, can be used in a variety of drinks (I hate to buy an ingredient that is somewhat pricey--say $30 on up--and is used only for that drink); i.e., the ingredients are versatile, and a will not lanquish on the shelf for years. Also, the drink is inherently tasty, it's not one that you have to "aquire" a taste for. Finally, it's drink that is popular with the general public and had been popular for several decades. Drinks like the martini, or the old fashioned, or the Rob Roy are examples of drinks that I would rate a five, even though I, personally don't care for vodkas. The Raton Canyon Cocktail, in my opinion should justify a five rating: All of the ingredients are easy to find and buy, individually they aren't real expensive, but each one can be used in many different cocktail recipies. It's a very tasty drink, with a variety of ingredients that blend together simply marverously into what I describe as a truly unforgettable. Yes, with no doubt, the Raton Canyon Cocktail is truly a five cocktail. Bottoms up, but slowly, and enjoy a truly unforgettable drink.

  • Reply to: Bartlett Tartlet   by   1 week 2 days ago

    Made with St George Pear Brandy, Pierre Ferrand 1840 and Combier Triple Sec. Divine. Like rich pear drops with a satisfying alcoholic warmth that lingers. Perfect accentuation of a beautiful pear note. 

  • Reply to: Mother-In-Law   by   1 week 2 days ago

    It's a nice drink and I'll make it again, but the quantities are odd. Halve it and you end up with (nearly) two proper drinks.

  • Reply to: Bad Word   by   1 week 3 days ago

    This is a drink about which I have mixed feelings. On my first sip, I found the drink to be intensely bitter, with my first impulse to be "throw the damn thing out!" However, after several more sips, I found the drink still to be bitter, like most Nargoni-like drinks, but I found myself rather liking the drink. For those of you who read the prior comments, let me clarify several points: one person said the drink was too "unctuous," which means greasy or fatty, which this drink is not. Another person said it was sublime, which means awe-inspring, This drink is not that, either.

    How would I describe it? Here are three ways: (1) A drink needing to get used to, (2) one that's intense tasting, and (3) one that's bitter, sour, or tart--take your pick. Now, am I saying don't bother with this drink? No! Not by any means. But I am saying the following: First, be prepared for a bitter and/or tart tasting drink. After all, consider the ingredients: Chartruese, lime, and gran classico. All say bitter/sour/tart. Second, like me, you may be inclined to say, "Yuck! This drink is terrible. I say, take a few more sips; you'll probably, as I did, end up rather liking the drink. Now, you're probably wondering how I rated the drink; Well, I rated it a _____.

  • Reply to: Too Much Too Little Too Late   by   1 week 3 days ago

    For fans of the Negroni and its many variants, this is the drink to drink! It's slightly sweet with the Cocchi Americano blending together with the Apricot liqueur. And there's just a tad of bitterness from the Gran Classico. As for the gin, I used Tanqueray Bloomsbury, a floral London Dry Gin that I, personally, like just a little more than Tanqueray Ten. And instead of Angostura Orange bitters, I used (on a whim) a dash of Blood Orange bitters by Bittermens. I don't think anything I did could make this drink taste any better-- it's a great drink on its own. If you don't believe me, try it!

  • Reply to: No Loitering   by   1 week 4 days ago

    <br />
    An interesting drink, one that I would probably put into the "after dinner" category. A little on the sweet side, with what I would describe as having a somewhat "thick" feel in the mouth--but not unpleasant by any means. For the rye, I used top-shelf 6 year-old Sazerac rye. I agree with one person who thought that the person who posted this cocktail should have specified the bitters to be used. I used black walnut as suggested by another person, but I was not entirely satisfied with the outcome. While it was not a bad choice for a bitters with this cocktail, I think there's probably a better choice. I just don't know what it is!

    Regardless, the basic drink is a good one, however I would not use an over-proof rye such as Rittenhouse because such ryes can overwhelm the other ingredients. Some solid ryes in the 80 to 95 proof range to consider are Wild Turkey Rye (81 proof), Michter's (90 proof), and Bulleit Small Batch rye (95proof). Now to search for a bitters that will complement the flavors in this otherwise great cocktail!

  • Reply to: Drink My Blood   by   1 week 5 days ago

    A drier version with Solerno instead of syrup

  • Reply to: Pear Collins   by   1 week 5 days ago

    Used rothmans pear liqueur instead of pear juice and skipped the syrup to makes a very delicate and dry cocktail.  Fabulous 

  • Reply to: Mai Tai (Trader Vic's)   by   1 week 5 days ago

    I know the comment is 2 1/2 years old but I was always befuddled but the person above bashing Smith & Cross, a highly regarded rum and one I find unique and interesting.  He evokes Ed Hamilton in his trash talk so I dug around Ed's Ministry of Rum web site looking for his scathing review and pretty much what I found was this...

    "...this is not a sipping rum by contemporary standards but rather reflects the tastes and production of the 19th century.  Used sparingly in cocktails it adds a broad dimension to both the aroma and taste in cocktails".

     

    Fair enough...  I'm not much of a rum sipper anyway but for me this is spot-on.

     

     

     

  • Reply to: Pegasus   by   1 week 5 days ago

    Curated from 1 to 2 drinks as it seems plenty big enough for two. Also fixed capitalization and tweaked up instructions to conform to style guidelines.

  • Reply to: Amer Picon Cocktail   by   1 week 5 days ago

    This is the ideal cocktail for those who like a sweet but not too sweet drink, and those who like a chocolate-like taste. I suspect that's about 80% of adult Americans. I used Amer Picon and one of my favorite top-shelf Italian vermouths, Contratto Rosso. This is a drink that deserves a top-shelf vermouth, whatever that brand may be. And it's definitely an after-dinner drink, one to be lingered over and enjoyed. Simple to make, and easy to enjoy!

  • Reply to: Penultimate Word   by   1 week 6 days ago

    <br />I

  • Reply to: Twentieth Century Cocktail (Meletti)   by   1 week 6 days ago

    My expectations for this drink were high; it was rated 5 by seven people. I made one minor change, reducing the lemon juice from 3/8 oz to 1/4 oz. I did this because over the years I found that the requisite amount of lemon juice for a given cocktail recipe was too much for my taste buds, so I generally reduce the amount of lemon juice by 40 to 50%. The result is--for me--a satisfactory cocktail. When I reduced the lemon juice here, I was left with a pleasant cocktail that I rated as 4.0. Later, I found in my refrigerator a pink lemon described as having a "tangy taste." So I tried it, using 3/8 oz of juice. I was pleasently surprised; it did not have the sour taste inherent in the traditional lemon. This libation I rated as 4.5. By the way, I used two dashes of the mole in both variations; I like a chocolate taste!.The next time I try this cocktail, I will use a Meyer lemon, which looks like a small orange, but is a lemon with a less sour taste. I will leave a comment on the outcome using a Meyer lemon, Some will wonder why am I doing all this? Good question! The reason is that I know I am not the only person who finds the requisite amount of lemon juice is too much, and even a small reduction is not entirely satisfactory. So, I am exploring other avenues as an alternative to the lemon when the cocktail recipe calls for lemon juice. Who knows--maybe the Nobel Peace prize!

  • Reply to: Penultimate Word   by   1 week 6 days ago

    <br />I stumbled upon this drink by accident today: it was the featured cocktail of the day at Kindredcocktail.com. I looked over the ingredients and decided to give it a try. I used a top-shelf gin, made by St. George in CA named Terroir. It is NOT a London Dry style gin; it is, as you might guess from the gin's name, a gin made from a variety of CA botanicals, including "Douglas Fir, CA bay laurel, fennel, coastal sage, orris root, angelica root, juniper berries, and other profoundly aromatic botanical ingrediients." I also reduced the lemon juice from 1 oz to 1/2 oz, and used a fat 1/2 oz Maraschino liqueur. The result was a splended drink, in part, I believe, to the uniquely earthy but wholey drinkable St. George gin. If this gin is not available, I recommend using a highly botonical gin such as Magellen Blue, Citadelle, or Tanqueray Bloomsbury. Tanqueray Ten may work well, also. Oh, yes, before I forget, I rated this drink 5.0 using the changes I made. How well another gin will work, I will leave to others to discover and comment on. Meanwhile, enjoy this drink; it is full of flavors.

  • Reply to: Adair Hook   by   2 weeks 3 hours ago

    Just revisited this one using Bluecoat, Cocchi di Torino, and Cynar 70. Mixed it once as posted and it was very nice: the C70 intensified the bitterness and ABV and in so doing balanced nicely against the hefty maraschino. Mixed it again with 2 oz gin and reduced the maraschino to 1 tsp. Better? Maybe. YOU make the call. Glad you dug it, wthrift. 

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