Recent comments

  • Reply to: Corpse Defiler #666   by   1 day 8 hours ago

    I love the name! Rock on! \m/ \m/

  • Reply to: 18th Century   by   2 days 8 hours ago

    I was o_O on the lime + cacao, but it's pretty darn good. Huh.

  • Reply to: Negrino   by   5 days 12 hours ago

    Little "Negroni." A very apt name for this wonderful drink. The "Negrino" is a somewhat small drink--weighing in at a mere 2 1/4 oz. It's meant to be sipped and enjoyed, slowly. The gin and Campari give this drink a taste similar to a Negroni, but the Punte e Mes and Fernet Branca give the drink a slighty different taste, especially with the lemon twist. For Negroni lovers, the Negrino will be an appreciated diversion. For those who have mixed thoughts about the Negroni, give it a try--the drink is less bitter, especially if you use 1 oz of a top shelf gin. For those who have never tried a Negroni, this drink is a good place to start.

    To make this drink, I used Tanqueray Ten (I didn't have the Megellan), and I used a full ounce. Also, I used a shy 1/4 oz of Fernet Branca. And the lemon zest/twist was the icing on the cake. I quickly and easily rated the Negrino at 4.0--almost 4.5. How would yout rate this drink?<br />

  • Reply to: Ford Cocktail   by   5 days 15 hours ago

    Whitechapel's take on this is 1 1/2 ounces Old Tom gin, preferably Jensen,1 ounce blanc vermouth, preferably Dolin, and 1/4 ounce Bénédictine: http://punchdrink.com/recipes/whitechapels-ford-cocktail/

  • Reply to: Corpse Defiler #666   by   1 week 1 day ago

    A surprisingly easy-to-drink drink. You'd expect something different because of the Campari and lemon juice, but everything blends well. There is a bitterness reminiscent of a Negroni, but the Bonal and lemon juice turn the Negroni bitterness into something a little more pleasant, thanks to the rye also (I used Rittenhouse 100). Although I rated the drink at 3.5, I was tempted to rate it at 4.0. Try this one; it just be your cup of tea!

  • Reply to: The Book Deal   by   1 week 2 days ago

    Ha! I found a cocktail called Eeyore's Requiem that I wanted to try and came to look see if there were similar cocktails by ingredients and found a cocktail made by the friend who introduced me to this site. Bitter hearts love alike!

    http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2011/02/anti-valentines-day-cocktail-...

  • Reply to: The Verdure   by   1 week 2 days ago

    Tasty and refreshing! A Spring cocktail with some depth.

  • Reply to: Cloak and Dagger   by   1 week 2 days ago

    What recipe do you like for the black pepper tincture? Thanks,  Zachary

  • Reply to: Sloppy Possum   by   1 week 2 days ago

    Soothing

  • Reply to: Silvio's Algorithm   by   1 week 3 days ago

    Higher math was always a stumbling block, so I was hesitant to try "Silvio's Algorithm." Until I looked at the ingredients, that is! I knew from the beginning that this drink was the Drinker's Drink. And the proof was in the pudding, as it were.

    I used Bols Genever Amsterdam gin--barrel-aged as specified, Angel's Envey, a good, but not well known bourbon--this batch distilled in port wine barrels at 86.6 proof, a skinney Fernet Branca, Aperol, and Amaro Meletti. And lemon zest, to finish it off. This is an incredibly smooth drink. The Meletti is there, as is the Aperol. Both provide a slight but necessary bitterness. The Genever gin sits quietly in the background, giving room for the bourbon to speak up, but softly so. And the lemon zest is a necessary must, to round out the flavors.

    There is a lot of alcohol in this drink, so plan accordingly. Two of these says get an alternate driver! But this drink is like a potato chip; it's hard to stop with one. So enjoy, but be careful. I rate "Silvio's Algorithim at a well-deserved 5.0.

  • Reply to: White Negroni   by   1 week 4 days ago

    It bothers me slightly that white negronis are vibrantly yellow (like Suze).  Good drink, though.

  • Reply to: Wedderburn or Bite   by   1 week 4 days ago

    A nice variation: split the rum between Smith & Cross and Appleton V/X, split the amaro between Cynar and Meletti. Slightly less funk, but a bit more expansive flavor-wise.

  • Reply to: Boulevardier 12   by   1 week 5 days ago

    I found the "Boulevardier 12" to be both a fascinating and tasty drink. Why fascinating? Well, it gave the drinker so many options: Bourbon or rye? which bourbon or rye? which sweet vermouth? and especially, which amaro?

    I decided to play it safe, and it worked. I used Jim Beam Black bourbon, Vya sweet vermouth, Picon Amer, and Bittermens Xocolatl Mole, along with the Campari and a hefty orange twist. This was a smooth, lightly sweet drink, with slightly bitter overtones and a hint of chocolate. I rated this concoction at 4.5. It don't get much better than this!

    Next time, I will try rye (not sure of the brand, as I have five options), also I'll try Dolin sweet vermouth, and finally I'll throw in Averna or Montenegro for the amaro. It should hit a rating of 4.0, at least. Wish me luck!

  • Reply to: Colonel Carpano   by   1 week 5 days ago

    The "Colonel Carpano" is one of these easy to imbibe drinks. Bourbon and Cynar is a common mix; more often than not, however, the recipe will call for a bourbon with more overtones than Buffalo Trace. But that, I think, is the strength of the "Colonel Carpano," Using Buffalo Trace instead of, say, Jim Beam Black, results in a democratic drink--that is to say, a drink in which no one ingredient overwhelms the other. I used the ingredients as called for, except I used 3 dashes of The Bitter Truth's Aromatic Bitters, instead of Peychaud's bitters, a with good result. Overall, the "Colonel Carpano" is an enjoyable drink, which goes down easily despite its slight bitterness via Cynar. Most drinkers who do not like the much more bitter Negroni, will find the Colonel Carpano to be a favorite. This drink also lends itself to different options; (e.g., a stronger bourbon, perhaps a rye, using a different bitter, and using a different vermouth such as punt e mes.) I rated this drink at 4.5.

  • Reply to: Colonel Carpano   by   1 week 5 days ago

    The "Colonel Carpano" is one of these easy to imbibe drinks. Bourbon and Cynar is a common mix; more often than not, however, the recipe will call for a bourbon with more overtones than Buffalo Trace. But that, I think, is the strength of the "Colonel Carpano," Using Buffalo Trace instead of, say, Jim Beam Black, results in a democratic drink--that is to say, a drink in which no one ingredient overwhelms the other. I used the ingredients as called for, except I used 3 dashes of The Bitter Truth's Aromatic Bitters, instead of 2 dashes of Peychaud's bitters, with good result.

    Overall, the "Colonel Carpano" is an enjoyable drink, which goes down easily despite its slight bitterness via Cynar. Most drinkers who do not like the much more bitter Negroni, will find the Colonel Carpano to be a favorite. This drink also lends itself to different options; (e.g., a stronger bourbon, perhaps a rye, using a different bitter, and using a different vermouth such as punt e mes.) I rated this drink at 4.5.

  • Reply to: Herb Tarlek   by   1 week 6 days ago

    Great name, Big Guy!

  • Reply to: Pink Flag   by   1 week 6 days ago

    Brava! Best tiki inspired drink I've ever had. It's the tiki tinged drink this floral/gin/herbal loving gal has been looking for her whole life!

  • Reply to: Vakantie   by   2 weeks 1 day ago

    Oh yes this is da bomb!

  • Reply to: Bella Luna   by   2 weeks 2 days ago

    Mine wasn't candylike: reduced st germain to .5, omitted syrup, probably would do better with even less st germain as it overpowers the creme yvette even at the reduced amount, sprig of rosemary which I didn't think would work but lent a nice spicy herbal touch to tame the sweetness a little.

  • Reply to: Brass Flower   by   2 weeks 3 days ago

    Very good drink, but like so many drinks with St. Germain​, you only need about half of what the recipe calls for, IMO. It's delightful stuff, but it's insanely sweet.

  • Reply to: Tailspin   by   2 weeks 3 days ago

    The Death & Co version lists a dash of orange bitters as well.

  • Reply to: Oaxacan Bijou   by   2 weeks 4 days ago

    A nice Mezcal drink with the right amount of peat. Not too sweet, as one person suggested. Myself, I recommend using 1oz of yellow chartreuse; using only 3/4oz may result in a stronger peat taste (a guess on my part). I used 3 dashes of orange bitters (2 ds of Regans' and 1of Angustora) with a nice result. With this drink, I also used an ample amount of lemon zest, which mixed well with the other ingredients. I rated the "Oaxacan Bijou" at 4.0; I almost went to 4.5--I obviously liked the drink!

  • Reply to: Venetian   by   2 weeks 4 days ago

    Like several others who commented on this drink, I also found the "Venetian" to be a tasty and enjoyable drink. Unlike Dan, I enjoy the taste of Amaretto, but only if it's in the background enough so that the drink is not too sweet and the other ingredients are not overwhelmed. Fortunately, the drink was not too sweet and the other ingredients held their own.

    Along with Campari and Disaronno, I used Tanqueray Ten gin (which can hold its own) and I paired it with a dry Spanish vermouth that is infused with unspecified herbs (my 1st use of this vermouth, and it worked well in this drink). For those interested in this unique vermouth, the company's name is Priorat Natur and the product is simply named Vermut. It is light brown in color and is bottled at 32 proof. If you like to explore vermouths (and are looking for a unique dry vermouth), I recommend this one. I paid $26 (in Michigan). By the way, I rated the "Venetian" at 4.0.

  • Reply to: Venetian   by   2 weeks 5 days ago

    Surprisingly fun template to play with. I enjoyed both Campari and Cynar variants. Would like to try Amer Picon here in the future.

  • Reply to: Adair Hook   by   2 weeks 5 days ago

    Made this with some suggested mods (50:50 dry to sweet vermouth, kicked up an Old Tom gin to 2oz). A very nicely balanced sweet/bitter character with some aged sherry notes from the fortified wines and a cleN refreshing character of the gin. 

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